NBCF Blog, Stories from the National Breast Cancer Foundation, INC

100 Miles of Brotherly Love
The Leadville Trail 100 mile bike race stretches across the Colorado Rockies and contains extreme terrain 9,200 feet above ground. Only 40% of its competitors finish. John Hansen (pictured left), one of the race’s participants, is riding to symbolize the challenges and hurdles that his sister, Re’Lynn, has overcome in her battle with Breast Cancer.
“John and his sister have always had a special relationship. They are very close and have always had an unconditional love for each other” says Julie Hansen, wife of John.
Re’Lynn explains where John’s passion for biking started:
“When we were younger, we competed in a bike race together. I was 16 and he was 12. We started before the sun came up and did not finish until it went down! John continued biking as he grew older. Our whole family has always been active together like this.” 
When Re’Lynn was diagnosed with Breast Cancer in November of 2012, John turned his bike training into a way to honor and raise money for Re’Lynn’s passions: Breast Cancer Awareness and Early Detection. His goal: $20,000! And with only a month left until the race, he is not far from reaching it. John and Re’Lynn’s reactions are pure astonishment.  
“Re’Lynn was most touched by the how responsive people were to the cause. She always felt as if people didn’t want to speak about their cancer. The many generous donations have caused her to feel hope.” John said. Re’Lynn then comments: “I believe in the kindness of humanity. This outpouring of love is amazing.”
Currently, John is with his training group, Vision Quest, in Colorado preparing for the race. He has donated $5000 of his own, and is matching all donations up to $10,000. Re’Lynn is almost done with her chemotherapy and surgeries and is ready to cheer her brother on in his personal battle for a cause!
Want to help? Donate to John and Re’Lynn’s Fundraiser or start your own. For more about Re’Lynn, please check out her blog.
 

100 Miles of Brotherly Love

The Leadville Trail 100 mile bike race stretches across the Colorado Rockies and contains extreme terrain 9,200 feet above ground. Only 40% of its competitors finish. John Hansen (pictured left), one of the race’s participants, is riding to symbolize the challenges and hurdles that his sister, Re’Lynn, has overcome in her battle with Breast Cancer.

“John and his sister have always had a special relationship. They are very close and have always had an unconditional love for each other” says Julie Hansen, wife of John.

Re’Lynn explains where John’s passion for biking started:

“When we were younger, we competed in a bike race together. I was 16 and he was 12. We started before the sun came up and did not finish until it went down! John continued biking as he grew older. Our whole family has always been active together like this.” 

When Re’Lynn was diagnosed with Breast Cancer in November of 2012, John turned his bike training into a way to honor and raise money for Re’Lynn’s passions: Breast Cancer Awareness and Early Detection. His goal: $20,000! And with only a month left until the race, he is not far from reaching it. John and Re’Lynn’s reactions are pure astonishment.  

“Re’Lynn was most touched by the how responsive people were to the cause. She always felt as if people didn’t want to speak about their cancer. The many generous donations have caused her to feel hope.” John said. Re’Lynn then comments: “I believe in the kindness of humanity. This outpouring of love is amazing.”

Currently, John is with his training group, Vision Quest, in Colorado preparing for the race. He has donated $5000 of his own, and is matching all donations up to $10,000. Re’Lynn is almost done with her chemotherapy and surgeries and is ready to cheer her brother on in his personal battle for a cause!

Want to help? Donate to John and Re’Lynn’s Fundraiser or start your own. For more about Re’Lynn, please check out her blog.

 

Mush for a Cure Brings A Unique Twist to Fundraising
It’s not very often you see a dog-sledding fundraiser for breast cancer. Much less one that has dogs in pink tu-tus! But that’s just the way the Mush for the Cure fundraiser does things.  Mush for the Cure has been fundraising for the National Breast Cancer Foundation every year since 2007.  From humble beginnings with a mere four participants, the race has grown to host over 50 participants, raising tens of thousands of dollars to further the NBCF mission of providing early detection services for women in need.  
Want to help? Donate to the Mush for the Cure fundraiser or start your own!

Mush for a Cure Brings A Unique Twist to Fundraising

It’s not very often you see a dog-sledding fundraiser for breast cancer. Much less one that has dogs in pink tu-tus! But that’s just the way the Mush for the Cure fundraiser does things.  Mush for the Cure has been fundraising for the National Breast Cancer Foundation every year since 2007.  From humble beginnings with a mere four participants, the race has grown to host over 50 participants, raising tens of thousands of dollars to further the NBCF mission of providing early detection services for women in need.  

Want to help? Donate to the Mush for the Cure fundraiser or start your own!

4 Guys, A Limo and a Fundraiser
Jack, Dan, John and Roger were planning a serious road trip. Multiple states. Cross-country, even. Then they thought, with all this effort going into the road trip, why not have it benefit the National Breast Cancer Foundation?
The Name: Rollin’ 4 Cancer
The Mission: One limo, 2 weeks, 4 guys, 6 states, 12 cities, 5000 miles to raise money for the National Breast Cancer Foundation.
The Journey: California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Louisiana.
The Destination: The Super Bowl!
But wait, they don’t have tickets. Why would four guys drive across the country to the city where the Super Bowl is being hosted and not actually go to the Super Bowl? Because with their decked-out limo and charismatic demeanors, that was the best place to raise funds and awareness - in front of an audience of thousands.
Along the way, they’ve gained the attention of the press, spoken on radio shows, and even started a Facebook page to chronicle their journey.

Want to help? Donate to the Rollin’ 4 Cancer fundraiser or start your own!

4 Guys, A Limo and a Fundraiser

Jack, Dan, John and Roger were planning a serious road trip. Multiple states. Cross-country, even. Then they thought, with all this effort going into the road trip, why not have it benefit the National Breast Cancer Foundation?

The Name: Rollin’ 4 Cancer

The Mission: One limo, 2 weeks, 4 guys, 6 states, 12 cities, 5000 miles to raise money for the National Breast Cancer Foundation.

The Journey: California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Louisiana.

The Destination: The Super Bowl!

But wait, they don’t have tickets. Why would four guys drive across the country to the city where the Super Bowl is being hosted and not actually go to the Super Bowl? Because with their decked-out limo and charismatic demeanors, that was the best place to raise funds and awareness - in front of an audience of thousands.

Along the way, they’ve gained the attention of the press, spoken on radio shows, and even started a Facebook page to chronicle their journey.

Want to help? Donate to the Rollin’ 4 Cancer fundraiser or start your own!

In Memory of Sue, The Grand Dame of Badger & Blade
Sue crafted homemade soaps and received an unusual request from a friend to create a men’s shave soap one day.  That single request resulted in her launching her own company of homemade shave soaps and scents, Saint Charles Shave.  She joined the online community, Badger and Blade (B&B), to chat with others about shaving products, and soon became a strong voice in the community, gaining the support and friendship of many.  
Sue was diagnosed with breast cancer in February 2010.  Because of her close ties to the B&B community, she posted about her illness soon after her diagnosis.







Take a Deep Breath & Then Walk Into the Fire
That’s what he did. My dad shaped my life. He instilled his values, compassion and most of all his courage. As a career firefighter he chose to willingly go into burning buldings. The previous week began with being put to the test. Can I walk a firery cancer road and walk back out? Last Monday morning (2/15), I found the dreaded lump. It wasn’t there Sunday. A classic symptom for IBC, a lump that seemingly appears overnight. It doesn’t show up early on mammogram but that’s another subject. The next morning, I was in the office of my internest. From his office I was sent for a mammogram and then a ultrasound. Wednesday was numerous phone calls. Thursday more doctor appointments and testing. Result: Wait for the entire weekend. It was the longest weekend I can remember. Even with the love and support of my adult children, brothers, family and friends that are also my family, the minutes ticked by slowly like hours. That I was alone beat me up worse than if someone had taken a 2x4 or baseball bat and beat me with it. I spent the weekend keeping as busy as I could in my shop, doing what I love, making product. With the long weekend wait behind me, my doctor called with the results of the breast/lymph node biopsies: positive for malignancy. Today was a full body bone scan with contrast and a full body CT also with contrast to look for involvement elsewhere. This Thursday afternooon, I will know the remainer of the treatment plan which now includes mastectomy and removal of at least 4 lymph nodes. Chemo, radiation, either one or both, are still undecided until full results of the above and two other test relults are known. How am I doing? I am still reeling, my mind running redline rpm’s. I think often I wish I could cry in the arms of my husband. I’m not a wimp, I can do this; I tell myself. My faith is strong as ever. I will wake up tomorrow and take on the day. I will take each day as it comes and I will deal with it, one step at a time.I regret the emotional pain this is causing in those that love me. I hope those that I love, know the depth of the love I have for them. There are some that I love that I am unable to tell them for fear of being inappropriate. I hope they know how much they mean to me, and yes, love. I pray that I will keep my faith and courage strong. In my mind and heart, I am holding both the hand of God in one hand and my dad’s hand in the other. 








The B&B community responded with hundreds of comments in support of Sue. She and her daughter posted updates of her progress as she went through treatment.  
On November 2, Sue passed away. But her spirit will forever live on in the B&B community.  As one B&B member stated, “Badger and Blade will not be the same when our grand dame takes her final bow, but she will not be forgotten. Not by me nor by many gents who’ve had the privilege of knowing Sue.”  
In memory of Sue, B&B is raising funds for the National Breast Cancer Foundation.  Want to help?  Donate to B&B’s fundraiser or start your own fundraiser! 

In Memory of Sue, The Grand Dame of Badger & Blade

Sue crafted homemade soaps and received an unusual request from a friend to create a men’s shave soap one day.  That single request resulted in her launching her own company of homemade shave soaps and scents, Saint Charles Shave.  She joined the online community, Badger and Blade (B&B), to chat with others about shaving products, and soon became a strong voice in the community, gaining the support and friendship of many.  

Sue was diagnosed with breast cancer in February 2010.  Because of her close ties to the B&B community, she posted about her illness soon after her diagnosis.

Take a Deep Breath & Then Walk Into the Fire

That’s what he did. My dad shaped my life. He instilled his values, compassion and most of all his courage. As a career firefighter he chose to willingly go into burning buldings. 

The previous week began with being put to the test. Can I walk a firery cancer road and walk back out? 

Last Monday morning (2/15), I found the dreaded lump. It wasn’t there Sunday. A classic symptom for IBC, a lump that seemingly appears overnight. It doesn’t show up early on mammogram but that’s another subject. 

The next morning, I was in the office of my internest. From his office I was sent for a mammogram and then a ultrasound. 

Wednesday was numerous phone calls. 

Thursday more doctor appointments and testing. Result: Wait for the entire weekend. 

It was the longest weekend I can remember. Even with the love and support of my adult children, brothers, family and friends that are also my family, the minutes ticked by slowly like hours. 

That I was alone beat me up worse than if someone had taken a 2x4 or baseball bat and beat me with it. I spent the weekend keeping as busy as I could in my shop, doing what I love, making product. 

With the long weekend wait behind me, my doctor called with the results of the breast/lymph node biopsies: positive for malignancy. 

Today was a full body bone scan with contrast and a full body CT also with contrast to look for involvement elsewhere. 

This Thursday afternooon, I will know the remainer of the treatment plan which now includes mastectomy and removal of at least 4 lymph nodes. 

Chemo, radiation, either one or both, are still undecided until full results of the above and two other test relults are known. 

How am I doing? I am still reeling, my mind running redline rpm’s. I think often I wish I could cry in the arms of my husband. I’m not a wimp, I can do this; I tell myself. My faith is strong as ever. I will wake up tomorrow and take on the day. I will take each day as it comes and I will deal with it, one step at a time.

I regret the emotional pain this is causing in those that love me. I hope those that I love, know the depth of the love I have for them. 

There are some that I love that I am unable to tell them for fear of being inappropriate. I hope they know how much they mean to me, and yes, love. 

I pray that I will keep my faith and courage strong. In my mind and heart, I am holding both the hand of God in one hand and my dad’s hand in the other. 

The B&B community responded with hundreds of comments in support of Sue. She and her daughter posted updates of her progress as she went through treatment.  

On November 2, Sue passed away. But her spirit will forever live on in the B&B community.  As one B&B member stated, “Badger and Blade will not be the same when our grand dame takes her final bow, but she will not be forgotten. Not by me nor by many gents who’ve had the privilege of knowing Sue.”  

In memory of Sue, B&B is raising funds for the National Breast Cancer Foundation.  Want to help?  Donate to B&B’s fundraiser or start your own fundraiser

5-Year Breast Cancer Survivor Runs Half Marathon for NBCF
In 2007, Alison was diagnosed with breast cancer.

Hearing the words, you have cancer is super scary, your life changes in an instant. With the huge support from my family, friends, colleagues, and my rock of a husband – Sam, I got through the most challenging nine months of my life. I was fortunate enough to be able to continue work, which gave me some kind of normality. I lost my hair and eyebrows, which was an experience in itself.

This year, Alison celebrates her fifth year as a breast cancer survivor and being cancer-free.  And she decided to celebrate in an unusual way - she signed up for the Pennsylvania half-marathon on October 21st and raised funds for the National Breast Cancer Foundation.
With her two best friends by her side, she completed the half marathon and was able to help raise awareness for breast cancer and exceeded her fundraising goal!  That’s a lot of accomplishments to celebrate!
Want to help?  Donate to Alison’s fundraiser or start your own fundraiser.

5-Year Breast Cancer Survivor Runs Half Marathon for NBCF

In 2007, Alison was diagnosed with breast cancer.

Hearing the words, you have cancer is super scary, your life changes in an instant. With the huge support from my family, friends, colleagues, and my rock of a husband – Sam, I got through the most challenging nine months of my life. I was fortunate enough to be able to continue work, which gave me some kind of normality. I lost my hair and eyebrows, which was an experience in itself.

This year, Alison celebrates her fifth year as a breast cancer survivor and being cancer-free.  And she decided to celebrate in an unusual way - she signed up for the Pennsylvania half-marathon on October 21st and raised funds for the National Breast Cancer Foundation.

With her two best friends by her side, she completed the half marathon and was able to help raise awareness for breast cancer and exceeded her fundraising goal!  That’s a lot of accomplishments to celebrate!

Want to help?  Donate to Alison’s fundraiser or start your own fundraiser.

Convoy of Hope: A Look Back at 2012
We first joined forces with Convoy of Hope last May, with our first event appropriately occurring in our home  city of Dallas, Texas. Since then, we have joined Convoy of Hope for outreaches in eight other cities across the country to bring breast health services to underserved women in local communities.  Through each of these outreaches, we were amazed by the volunteers who served so passionately, touched by the stories of the women we were serving, and empowered by the need that was so apparent for the services we were providing.  
One of the guests that stopped by our tent, Sherylynn, had been putting off getting a mammogram because she was scared to go to the doctor’s office.  She pre-qualified for a free mammogram through our partner breast health facility that day.  
Through these outreaches, we offered free educational materials, signed women up to receive early detection text reminders, showed women how to do breast self-exams, pre-qualified women for free mammograms through our partner breast health facilities and, in some locations, provided free mammograms through our facility partners’ mammovans.


“I’m a single mom and needed to get groceries. I didn’t realize the NBCF tent was going to be here. I just signed up to receive qualification for a mammogram. This will help me so much. I am overwhelmed by how much is here, not just for my kids but also for me!”
- Crystal, Convoy of Hope guest


Here’s a look at our 2012 Convoy of Hope outreaches by the numbers:
5,157 guests served
227 volunteers
442 pre-qualified for free mammograms through our partner breast health facilities
42 screening mammograms on-site
3,475 signed up for the NBCF early detection plan to receive text reminders
3,313 received training on how to do a breast self exam
18,010 educational materials distributed
Thank you for helping us serve these women in partnership with Convoy of Hope this year!  We are looking forward to our next outreach in 2013!

Convoy of Hope: A Look Back at 2012

We first joined forces with Convoy of Hope last May, with our first event appropriately occurring in our home  city of Dallas, Texas. Since then, we have joined Convoy of Hope for outreaches in eight other cities across the country to bring breast health services to underserved women in local communities.  Through each of these outreaches, we were amazed by the volunteers who served so passionately, touched by the stories of the women we were serving, and empowered by the need that was so apparent for the services we were providing.  

One of the guests that stopped by our tent, Sherylynn, had been putting off getting a mammogram because she was scared to go to the doctor’s office.  She pre-qualified for a free mammogram through our partner breast health facility that day.  

Through these outreaches, we offered free educational materials, signed women up to receive early detection text reminders, showed women how to do breast self-exams, pre-qualified women for free mammograms through our partner breast health facilities and, in some locations, provided free mammograms through our facility partners’ mammovans.

“I’m a single mom and needed to get groceries. I didn’t realize the NBCF tent was going to be here. I just signed up to receive qualification for a mammogram. This will help me so much. I am overwhelmed by how much is here, not just for my kids but also for me!”

- Crystal, Convoy of Hope guest

Here’s a look at our 2012 Convoy of Hope outreaches by the numbers:

  • 5,157 guests served
  • 227 volunteers
  • 442 pre-qualified for free mammograms through our partner breast health facilities
  • 42 screening mammograms on-site
  • 3,475 signed up for the NBCF early detection plan to receive text reminders
  • 3,313 received training on how to do a breast self exam
  • 18,010 educational materials distributed

Thank you for helping us serve these women in partnership with Convoy of Hope this year!  We are looking forward to our next outreach in 2013!

Diana’s Head-Shaving Support Group

Diana was recently diagnosed with breast cancer and found out that she would be undergoing chemotherapy and her hair would fall out.  Not one to wait for her hair to fall out, Diana took control and held a Head-Shaving Party to shave her head and raise funds for the National Breast Cancer Foundation.  And for each every $200 raised, one of Diana’s friends or family would shave their heads in her honor.  

At the end of the night, there were a lot of bald heads!  

Diana and her sister

Want to help?  Donate to Diana’s fundraiser or start your own fundraiser.

Christine’s Story

Christine is like many busy moms with a hundred things on her to-do list.  She has two small children to take care of, errands to run and dinner to cook.  So when she turned 40 and her doctor told her it was time for her routine mammogram, she put it off because of her busy schedule, figuring she’d get around to it eventually.

A year later, Christine noticed a lump in her breast.  She had no insurance and thought maybe she could save up enough money to get a mamogram later. Her friend urged her to go to St. Vincent’s Medical Center and talk to them about her options.  

"The first thing they told me at St. Vincent’s was that the mammogram would be taken care of.  I had no excuse to put it off.  Within a half an hour, I had an appointment."

Through a grant from the National Breast Cancer Foundation, St. Vincent’s was able to provide Christine the mammogram she needed.  She was diagnosed with breast cancer and is currently undergoing treatment.

The National Breast Cancer Foundation provides mammograms and breast health services for women in need across the country through partnerships with medical hospitals and facilities. Learn more at nbcf.org

Run for Hollis

When Rawson Livezy’s sister, Hollis, was diagnosed with breast cancer, he made a pledge to run the October 2012 Atlanta half-marathon in her honor. He started a fundraiser for the National Breast Cancer Foundation to get friends and family involved in the Run for Hollis.

“I will never forget the feeling I got when I heard the news that my sister had been diagnosed with breast cancer. It is a helpless feeling and one that I wouldn’t wish upon anybody. My younger sister Rebecca and I have grown up having the best big sister anybody could ask for. Hollis is the nicest and most loving person that I know. I couldn’t think of anything I could do for my sister to fix this situation we have been forced to deal with so I decided to commit to running a race in Hollis’ name.”

- Rawson Livezy

Inspired by Hollis, Rawson and Rebecca, friends and family joined the fundraiser, even creating bracelets with “Holliboo Is My Hero” and “For K-Peasey” in honor of Hollis.

And Rawson won’t be running alone. The Run for Hollis team will have over 65 runners in the October 2012 Atlanta half-marathon.

Learn more about the Run for Hollis and get involved at http://breastcan.cr/RunforHollis

Bringing Help To Women in Dallas with Convoy of Hope

We kicked off our partnership with Convoy of Hope a few weeks ago with our first event in our own backyard of Dallas, Texas.  We were excited to be offering breast health services to women in need and to make an impact in the Dallas community.  What we didn’t realize was the impact the people we were serving would have on us.

As we entered the event, we saw tents for shoes, groceries, haircuts, job assistance, healthcare and family photos.  We took a few minutes to walk through these tents and were moved to tears as we saw the joy on a child’s face as they received a new pair of shoes, and the relief of parents who received groceries for their family. 

At our tent, pink and white striped so that it cast a pink glow on everyone inside, we welcomed women with an overview of the resources available inside the tent, calendars with educational information and pink bags so they could easily carry the information they would be collecting that day.  We set up iPads so women could watch educational videos on Beyond the Shock and create an Early Detection Plan which we could print for them to take home. 

Parkland Hospital, one of our partners, brought their mammovan and were able to perform 40 mammograms for women who could not afford them and made mammogram appointments for many others.  One of the Parkland nurses held demonstrations for how to perform a breast self-exam, stressing the importance of this as a way to detect any abnormalities early.

Natasha stopped by our tent and told us that she wanted to come by because of a friend that had breast cancer.  Her friend had been too scared to get a mammogram because she didn’t know what to expect, despite finding a lump in her breast.  Her friend had recently passed away. 

Natasha got her first mammogram that day at the Parkland Hospital mammovan.  Her advice to women: “Don’t wait. Don’t wait another day, don’t wait another minute. Get screened.”

Our next stop with Convoy of Hope is in Frederick, Maryland!